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http://fatboygear.net

http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/consumer/a-big-music-year-for-j...

It looks like physical and digital sales were all up last year from 2008 with vinyl making the biggest jump of 33%.

As labels continue to shrink and let employees go, it would make sense that certain segments of entrepreneurs are seeing increases in revenue based on these figures. But who is benefiting?

Can we expect a trickle down effect for the supportive services we provide to recording artists?

Where are you seeing the most increase? I know many have seen a small increase in bookings and projects toward the end of summer and this year has definitely been better than last. But are we, as a whole, working more for less?

Do you take this report as a good sign of things to come?

I value all your opinions.

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Increased music sales are just a sign that things are getting better. The economy took a rough hit only 2 years ago. The fact that people are able to buy luxury items like records is an indicator that people are beginning to get back to a more comfortable place financially throughout the US. I've noticed increases in numbers of people out in the clubs as well. I've not been in Nashville long enough to know if people here are working more for less, but I know I have been and I think I'm probably not alone there simply because clubs across the country have stopped paying as much as they used to- due to decreased sales etc... I doubt there will be much of a trickle down effect in the near future, maybe more at the beginning of next year. But- there are still a lot of artists who need things done (Including ME!), so I see it as a promising sign for the future. Thanks for the article!

On a side note- I'm really happy people are going back to vinyl. Analog just sounds better.. no 1's and 0's necessary.. long live the 45rpm...
when you consider this and this, i'm not sure what the signs are pointing to...

add to that the stats that more folks are streaming music (which could mean they'll be buying even less) and i'd say we're still in the middle of the chaos. there are ups and downs, but at the end of the ride, i think the changes will be transformational.

the old model will continue to deteriorate. and it's gonna be ruff. i think we're going to continue to see shifts in how we fund recordings, in copyright law, in emerging technologies and perhaps even in how we understand the tenuous relationship between art and commerce.

and maybe that's actually the good news.

our drive to create will survive. we'll figure it out. we always do.

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